Build Log // Gimbal // 02

This thing is huge! This gimbal is too big for the stand that I ordered and once I had it initially assembled, it dwarfed my Canon D6.

As I mentioned in the previous post, where and how things attach is pretty straight forward. What I haven’t been able to determine is how to make sure the depth and angle of each support tube is correct. These tubes are intended to be adjustable, the weight and size of the camera will ultimately determine how long or short each segment is made.

Roll axis motor, notched carbon tube.

Roll axis motor, notched carbon tube.

The down tube, which has the roll axis motor on it connects to the horizontal arms with this carbon tube. This tube has notched ends which slide over screws which are inside the bracket connecting each horizontal arm. This tube has to be in the correct position to maintain a prefect 90° angle.

I think I’ll just eyeball it.

 

Roll axis support thingy

Roll axis support thingy

What adds to the complexity is the addition of what I call the “roll support thingy”. This curved extra thick piece of carbon fiber passes through a set of pulleys attached to the pan motor, and connects on both sides of the horizontal arms. This extra point of contact will make it even more imperative that every joint is squared and even. The support also adds quite a bit of friction, I suspect that will require some lubrication to make the camera roll as smoothly as possible.

 

Calipers and digital pitch gauge.

Calipers and digital pitch gauge.

To help me get everything level and balance I’ve enlisted the help of the digital calipers and a digital pitch gauge. The pitch gauge is basically a high tech level used for setting the pitch of the rotors on an RC helicopter.

About The Author

Camera/Gimbal Operator

Website developer by day and a camera/gimbal operator for Cloudgate, Inc. also by day.